30 Days of Hope

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With Thanksgiving in the air, on a daily basis, through my running, I have found new reasons to give thanks. Running has taught me many things about life. Someone once said when you have your health you have everything.

November is pancreatic cancer awareness month. I knew I needed to do something more to help raise awareness. For the past 30 days, I have spent each day with someone who is either a survivor or lost a loved one to pancreatic cancer, with my new campaign called 30 Days of Hope. Through this journey, being with people who have been affected by this disease has caused me to think about how precious life is.  How important it is to do what you love and be with the ones you love. Be thankful that you can run even the distances you can.  Most people can not go that far.

Having a goal of a 5K, 10K, Half Marathon or a Full Marathon is an amazing healthy goal. That is why I love the Kona Marathon. You are surrounded by the Aloha Spirit and let’s face it, when you finish the Kona Marathon you are in Kona, Hawaii and it doesn’t get much better then that.

Hope to see you there.

Aloha, Julie

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For additional information on the Kona Marathon Events please visit konamarathon.com

How much protein do you need?

New research suggests that many of us may need more protein than we realize. The current RDA is 0.8 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight, but several studies have found that 1 to 1.2 grams may be more protective against age-related muscle loss. Use this formula from Caroline Apovian, MD, to determine the minimum amount of protein you should eat daily to offset muscle loss—and protect your metabolism—while you lose weight.

STEP 1: Estimate your ideal weight. “If you’re a woman, start with 100 pounds for the first 5 feet in height, and add 5 pounds for every extra inch,” says Dr. Apovian. “For men, it’s 106 pounds for 5 feet in height, plus 6 pounds for every additional inch. However, if your ideal weight is less than 120 pounds, don’t eat less than 82 grams of protein daily.”

STEP 2: Ideal Weight (in pounds) / 2.2 = Ideal Weight (in kilograms)

STEP 3: Ideal Weight (in kilograms) x 1.5 = Daily Protein Goal (in grams)

Now that you know how much you need, check out these metabolism-boosting, protein-packed foods!

Avocado

Protein content: 2 grams per half avocado. The protein in this fruit contains all nine essential amino acids, plus heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Cheese and Milk Protein

content: 6 to 7 grams per ounce; 9 to 10 grams per 1 cup
Go for low-fat options—they generally contain more protein than fattier alternatives.

Tempeh
Protein

content: 15 grams per 1/2 cup. Its nougat-like texture makes tempeh a smart stand-in for meat. Sauté, or crumble cooked tempeh over salads.

Asparagus

Protein content: 4 grams per 1 cup (chopped)

This tasty veggie is a nutrient powerhouse. Enjoy it steamed or grilled, or toss chopped spears into salads.

Legumes

Protein content: 7 to 9 grams per 1/2 cup (cooked)

Pair dried beans (think black beans, chickpeas and lentils) with rice or quinoa for a complete-protein meal.

Greek-Style Yogurt

Protein content: 18 grams per 6 ounces

This thick and creamy treat packs nearly twice as much protein as other dairy sources; it’s great with fruit.

Tree Nuts

Protein content: 4 to 6 grams per 2 tablespoons

A small handful of walnuts or almonds is great as a snack, mixed into yogurt or oatmeal, or on a salad.

Edamame

Protein content: 8.5 grams per 1/2 cup (shelled)

A single serving packs nearly every trace mineral your body needs, including iron, magnesium and zinc.

Whey Protein

Protein content: 24 grams per 1 ounce

Add a scoop to smoothies or water for a quick protein hit. Avoiding animal products? Try soy protein powder.

Spinach

Protein content: 5 grams per 1 cup (cooked)

Of all the leafy greens, spinach boasts the highest protein content. Try it sautéed with a bit of garlic

Tofu Protein

content: 12 grams per 3 ounces. Made from soybeans, this low-cal, versatile protein will take on any flavor, from Asian to barbecue.

Fish and Shellfish

Protein content: 28 grams per 4 ounces. Whether it’s salmon, halibut or tuna, seafood is a great catch. Aim for 3 to 5 servings a week.

PseudograinsProtein content: 5 to 9 grams per 1 cup (cooked)
These hearty, grain like seeds (quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat) have more protein than traditional grains.

Eggs

Protein content: 12 grams per 2 eggs; 14 grams per 4 egg whites. However you prepare them, eggs and egg whites are smart fuel for muscles.

Poultry and Pork

Protein content: 28 grams per 4 ounces. Family favorites like skinless chicken and pork make it easy to score plenty of protein at each meal.

Hemp Seeds

Protein content: 10 grams per 2 tablespoons. Great for soups and salads, these seeds have eight of the nine essential amino acids that build muscle.

Cottage Cheese

Protein content: 14 grams per 1/2 cup. Eating a scoop doesn’t mean you’re on a diet—it means you’re muscle savvy. Try adding it to smoothies.

Beef Protein

content: 28 grams per 4 ounces. Look for the absolute leanest cuts, like round roast or top sirloin. Try bison for a leaner red-meat alternative.

The New Year is Coming!

The New Year is coming, creating a game plan of new race goals is good.  It doesn’t even have to be a race but goals in general are key to really LIVING your life.  What ever it is, running, biking, swimming, dancing, talking a cooking class, now is a good time to

align your goals and make them happen.

If it’s running that you love,then aligning a few races that can help you build in distance, before the Kona Marathon 2014, can be the perfect way to build speed and get results.  Start with a 5K, and then possibly a 10K, maybe throw in a Half Marathon.  The season is upon us, Turkey Trots, Jingle Jogs, they are all out there.  Once you set a goal, the universe conspires to make it happen.  “So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”  This way, when you show up in Kona for race day, whatever distance you are running, walking or even just enjoying the fruits of your labor, you will be ready.

Enjoy the journey!  We Got This!!

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Kona Ambassador, Julie Weiss the Marathon Goddess (center #2006) with fellow runners.

Kona Marathon past Rock Stars

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Every year, the Kona Marathon brings a wealth of fresh faces to the starting line, but its aloha spirit, welcoming staff and gorgeous locale also bring back past runners and winners. And with the 20th Anniversary just around the corner, we reached out to some past winners to celebrate this year.

Karl Honma

Karl’s first two marathon wins were at Kona, one of which was the Kona Marathon’s inaugural race in 1994. “Four young men that I coached supported me along the course and it was special to have the runner/coach roles reversed.”

Karl even celebrates birthdays at the Kona Marathon, where he rang in his fortieth birthday the last time he ran the race. On his 2013 return he comments, “This time, it will be my first race as a 50-year-old … it’s a birthday present to myself!”

Karl’s return to the Kona Marathon is testament to his passion for running and he’s proud of his continued involvement in the sport. “When I encounter former athletes and students, they always ask if I still run. My wife and 3-year-old daughter cheer for me at races and that’s so wonderful. I owe them. Others may run faster than me, but they won’t run harder.”

Connie Comiso-Fanelli

When thinking on her Kona Marathon win, Connie remembers the challenges, but also the good times.

The event is full of good friends and better memories, and returning for the 20th Anniversary is an exciting prospect for Connie. “The course has changed over 20 years, the some of the staff has come and gone, but it still has that ‘family feeling’ to it, and Sharron is keeping that tradition going strong.”

Running since 1978, Connie turned to the sport to improve her health. Now, after 35 years of running, it’s still a major part of her life. “I’m just grateful that I can still run after 35 years of competing, though not nearly as fast, still feeling the exhilaration and thrill of the sport. And I’m looking forward to seeing my friends in Kona again and sharing a cold Kona Brewing beer at the finish line!”

Justin Gillette

Running runs in Justin’s family. His brother is also a runner and Justin’s wife, Melissa, won the Kona Marathon alongside her husband in 2010. Justin has been running marathons since 1999 and currently ranks fifth in the world with 63 career wins. “This all started because I enjoyed my first run and wanted to do a second run. The second run became a third, which eventually led to a race, and the rest, as they say, is history.”

Justin won his first Kona Marathon in 2008 and has since won the marathon every year. “When I first did the Kona Marathon in 2008 it represented my fourteenth marathon win. The race was still growing and evolving as an event, and likewise, I was still growing into a runner.”

Justin is excited to return for Kona’s 20th Anniversary. “The twentieth edition will be a neat experience where the past history of the race is honored along with the future optimism that is buzzing for the event.”

Jeannie Wokasch-Parente

Jeannie, an eight-time Kona Marathon winner, is a huge fan of the Marathon. She has participated in nearly every Kona Marathon since its inception in 1994 and loves coming back. Every year she chooses a charity to run for, helping that group spread awareness and raise money. The 2013 event will be dedicated to Talk About Curing Autism. When we talked with Jeannie she said “I love the Kona Marathon; they are like a family to me. I’d cry if I wasn’t able to run it every year!”

These are just a few of the talented, passionate runners associated with the Kona Marathon. Their positive attitudes, inspiring stories and dedication to the sport are just a few of the touchstones that make the Kona Marathon what it is today.

Kona Marathon supports troops in Qatar

The Kona Marathon and Family Runs is honored to announce that for the third year we have sponsored a Kona Marathon Military Shadow Run. Support of our Service Members putting themselves in harm’s way to protect and ensure our freedom is very important to our management team.

Being deployed in foreign countries and combat zones does not normally present our troops the opportunity to run in organized races. The Kona Marathon feels it is very important to promote these Shadow Runs in order to help build and maintain moral.

This year the Kona Marathon Shadow Run was held in Qatar. There were 39 participants from four U.S. Military Units:

  • Joint Communications Support Element (JCSE)
  • Special Operations Command Central (SOCCENT)
  • United States Forces-Afghanistan (USFOR-A)
  • Central Command (CENTCOM)

The Kona Marathon Military Shadow Run was held in May in order to avoid the intense Middle East desert heat in June. Our men and women in uniform participated in all four Kona Marathon events; Marathon, Half Marathon, 10k and 5k and were awarded finisher medals and t-shirts for their respective races. In return, we were sent an U.S. Flag that was flown over the skies of Afghanistan in a combat refueling mission in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. This flag will be proudly flown over our race finish line on June 23.

For details on the 20th Anniversary Kona Marathon and Family Runs being held on June 22-23 and the entire week of events, visit konamarathon.com.

3 Ways to Run Through the Heat

Dealing with high temperatures and humidity on race day is a critical success factor: If you can’t or don’t know how to do it, your day could end prematurely and most likely your finishing time will fall outside of your goal.

That said the heat affects many runners long before they reach the starting line. Simply based on where they live and the time of year, these folks spend the majority of their training schedule attempting to avoid the performance-killing effects of high temps.

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Increased heat means a distorted sense of perceived exertion (your easy pace feels really hard) and an increased heart rate (your body is working double time to keep cool and keep moving). But while your overall performance deteriorates when temps are above an “optimal” range, your muscles aren’t working any harder just because it’s hot. In fact, the opposite is true: the slower you run, the less stress you are placing on your running-specific muscles.

Less stress means less work, and ultimately less adaptation. To put it another way, it’s like being able to bench press 100 lbs, but on really hot days you only put 85 lbs on the bar because it feels harder. The Marathon Nation focus is on quality, not quantity, and so we need to solve for this heat if the training is to work. So how do you continue to keep the pressure on your body to see progress, yet avoid overtraining?

Suggestions

Here are three ideas you can use to adjust your workouts to compensate for the heat. Whatever you do, don’t train yourself so hard you earn a free hospital journey — it’s just not worth it!

1. Run in the early morning. The temps are not as hot and the air quality is pretty good. This is your best bet if your schedule allows for it. Editors note: the Kona Marathon starts at 5:30am for this reason

2. Run slightly further because you’ll be going at a slower pace for a given effort / heart rate. If you wanted to run 7 miles at 9:00 pace, but you can only muster 9:30s or 9:45s, then extend your run to 8 or 8.5 miles. Just make sure you have means to stay hydrated and stay protected in the sun!

3. Adjust the intervals of your harder runs in order to continue running at your normal paces. You can do this by:

  • Running shorter work intervals. Do 6 x 2.5 minutes instead of 3 x 5 minutes;
  • Taking longer recoveries between work intervals so as to be ready for the next work piece; or
  • Splitting tempo runs into intervals. Make that 6 mile tempo run into 3 x 2 miles or 2 x 3 miles with breaks in the middle to hydrate properly and get cool.

Regardless of which option you chose for your particular workout (or entire training cycle), adapting how you train based on the conditions in which you have to train is critical. You can only ignore the realities of heat and its affect on your body and ability to run for so long; learn to bend like a reed!